PREVIOUS SESSIONS

Check out the abstracts and video recordings of presentations from our previous speakers.

SESSION #01

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

FOR

SENSORY

AUGMENTATION

The inaugural session of the re:MAKING SENSE series took stock of the state of the art in sensory augmentation and asked what the most significant challenges are to the widespread use of these technologies, and where the field may be headed in the near future.

Wherein lie the hurdles? Our scientific understanding of perception? Our technological capability to interface with the body? Conceptual quandaries around the nature of subjective experience? Public resistance to the notion of enhancement? 

LINEUP #01

TO KICK OFF THE SERIES WE'VE

CURATED THE FIRST DISCUSSION

(presentations in order)

Marianne_Obrist.jpg

Marianna Obrist

Professor of Multisensory Interfaces at UCL

Marianna's research ambition is to establish touch, taste, and smell as interaction modalities in human-computer interaction (HCI), spanning a range of application scenarios, from immersive VR experiences to automotive, and health/wellbeing uses.

scott.jpg

Scott Novich, phd

CTO & Co-founder of Neosensory

Non-invasive sensory augmentation--using touch in particular--is a nascent field with massive untapped potential. To realize this potential, Scott thinks that we need to be focusing our efforts on low-power highly scalable systems designed to interface directly with our sensory receptors.

liviu.jpg

Liviu Babitz

CEO & Co-founder of CyborgNest

Liviu creates devices that he calls 'Plug n Be' - he will be speaking about the time it takes for the brain to learn a new permanent sensory input. It takes years for newborns to understand sensory data, and as adults it can be pretty frustrating to start this long process anew, but totally worth the journey.

Madeline Schwartzman

New York City artist, author, and educator

Her book See Yourself Sensing: Redefining Human Perception, established conceptual categories for perception-altering art and technology, and examined projects for the human sensorium across multiple disciplines from the 1960’s onwards.